HYBRIDITY AND UNHOMELINESS IN FADIA FAQIR'S WILLOW TREES DON'T WEEP: ANALYTICAL STUDY IN POSTCOLONIAL DISCOURSE

Authors

  • Fazel Asadi Amjad, Sarmad Albusalih

Abstract

The present study is an attempt to shed light on Fadia Faqir's Willow Trees Don't Weep (2014)
with a reference to Homi Bhabha's hybridity and unhomeliness. The critical analysis of the novel
reveals that Najwa, Faqir's protagonist, acquiesces to practice hybridity and unhomeliness in
Willow Trees Don't Weep. Faqir's other characters push Najwa to their own favored kind of
identity and Najwa is caught in a state of hybridity and unhomeliness. She is upset by the
heaviness of dualism between the Western and the Islamic worlds. It might be argued that the
choice of Najwa's father, Omer Rahman, of Jihad and also her mother's secular thoughts and
ideas considerably aggravated Najwa’s state of life toward a fragmented state of identity.
Najwa’s research journey for finding her father, who abandoned his family since she was three
years old. After she reached twenty-seven years of age and shortly after her mother’s death it
becomes imperative for her to find him because of the harshness of the Jordanian society which
traditionally considers a house without a man is a house without honor. The Jordanian patriarchy
society instigates Najwa to undertake the journey and during the journey, Najwa undergoes the
experience of cultural hybridity and unhomely feeling.

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Published

2020-11-29

How to Cite

Fazel Asadi Amjad, Sarmad Albusalih. (2020). HYBRIDITY AND UNHOMELINESS IN FADIA FAQIR’S WILLOW TREES DON’T WEEP: ANALYTICAL STUDY IN POSTCOLONIAL DISCOURSE. PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt / Egyptology, 17(6), 1221 - 1233. Retrieved from http://mail.palarch.nl/index.php/jae/article/view/836